Yorkshire Chess Association Year Book

2017-2018

 

Contents

Calendar of Events – Results/Reports

 

 I<< Year Book Home

 

Accuracy of club information &

Yearbook: further copies &

YCA Honorary Life Members &

Yorkshire Individual Championship 2018

Message from the President

Officers 2017-18

Annual Fees

County Match Fees & Petrol Allowance

Junior Contacts

YCA League Match Venues

Secretaries of Competing Clubs

Match Correspondents ‑ Woodhouse Cup

Match Correspondents ‑ IM Brown

Match Correspondents ‑ Silver Rook

YCA League Fixtures 2017-2018

ECF Game Fee Changes &c

Joining the ECF

Standard-play Grading Trends 2002-17

Notes on the YCA Grading List

Results Graded July 2016 to June 2017

YCA Grading List

Yorkshire Junior Reports

Correspondence Chess Report

U-160 Captain’s Message

2016-17 League Tables & Match Results

County Match Result Summary

English County Finals 2017

English County Championship 1921

Recent Winners of YCA Events

Constitution and Rules

YCA League Rules

Index to Rules

Individual Championship Rules

Contact Details Index

Event Calendar 2017-18

 

 

54th Hull Chess Congress

Game

 

(Back to Main Report)

 

Hull Congress 2017

Intermediate, Round 5, 29/10/2017

Board 40

White: Peter Owst; Black: Ian Lamb, (½-½)

 

 

1. d4

e6

 

 

2. c4

Nf6

 

 

3. Nc3

Bb4

 

 

4. Bd2

O-O

 

 

5. a3

Bxc3

 

 

6. Bxc3

Ne4

 

 

7. Nf3

Nxc3

 

 

8. bxc3

b6

 

 

9. e3

Bb7

 

Another idea is 9. .. c5, when Black retains the option of a later .. Qa5.

 

10. Bd3

f5

 

 

11. Qc2

d6

 

 

12. Ke2

 

 

White maybe plans to try a kingside attack, and presumably isn’t comfortable with 12. O‑O‑O, e.g. 12. .. Qe7 13. Kb2 e5 when 14. Bxf5 is met by .. e4.  However, leaving the king in the centre looks worse.

 

 

Nd7

 

 

13. h4

 

 

If Black had a pawn at g6 then this would seem natural.  Here, White perhaps aims to support a possible Ng5, and perhaps aims to resolve discomfort on the a8-h1 diagonal by allowing Rh2.  Black ignores all this and continues preparing e5.

 

 

Qf6

 

 

14. Qb3

Kh8

 

Lest c5 by White is nasty at some stage.

 

15. Rh2

e5

 

 

16. Bc2

e4

 

 

17. Nd2

f4

 

Black pushes on with his pawns before White plays g3, sacrificing a pawn for the scent of blood.

 

18. Bxe4

fxe3

 

 

19. fxe3

Qf2+

 

 

20. Kd3

Bxe4+

 

 

21. Nxe4

Qf5

 

Maybe Black will be able to get off home earlier than expected!  (Actually, dad was still playing a long game in the Major.)

 

22. g4!

Qxg4

 

If 22.  .. Qg6 then 23. h5 shifts the queen.

 

23. Nd2

Rae8

 

23. .. Qg6+ looks better in general terms, as 24. Ke2 is forced, if loss of material is to be avoided.  However, 23. .. Rae8 may well force a tactical win of a pawn.

 

24. Qd1

 

 

24. Nf1 might plug more holes in the dam.

 

 

Qg3

 

 

25. Qe2

Qg6+

 

 

(Position after 25. Qe2)

Surely 25. .. Rxe3+ won a pawn, e.g. 26. Qxe3 Qxh7, and if 27. Qe7 then 27. .. Qh3+ holds things.

 

26. e4

Qg3+

 

Perhaps 26. .. Nf6 and then even doubling rooks on the e-file was better.

 

27. Kc2

 

 

White’s king is suddenly much safer‑looking.

 

 

Nf6

 

 

28. Rh1

Qg6

 

 

29. Rg2

Qf7

 

 

30. Rhg1

Rg8

 

 

Draw agreed, perhaps through relief and disappointment on different sides
rather than due to lack of play left in the position reached.