Yorkshire Chess History

 

Contents:

Samuel John Holloway, Mrs Edith Martha Holloway

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Samuel John Holloway

 

Mrs. Edith Martha Holloway

Born:

1867, Kensington

 

Born (as Crittenden):

1868, London

Baptised:

 

 

Baptised:

 

Died:

06/12/1946, London

 

Died:

08/05/1956, London

Buried:

 

 

Buried:

 

 

Non-Chess Life of Samuel John Holloway

 

The parents of Samuel John Holloway were Bernard Holloway (born 1833, Cam, Gloucestershire) and Helen Mary Ann Holloway (née Royle 1841, Kentish Town) who had at least the following six children, all born in one part or another of London:

 

Helen Marion Holloway

born 1866, Kensington

Samuel John Holloway

born 1867, Kensington

Bernard Holloway, junior

born 1868, Kensington

Eveline Annie Holloway

born 1869, Acton

Amelia Isabel Holloway

born 1872, Islington

Gertrude Eliza Holloway

born 1874, Islington

 

The dates and places of birth of the children, and census addresses, suggest the parents set up home initially in Samuel’s native Kensington, then moved in 1869 (give or take a year) to Acton, and then moved in 1870 (give or take a year) to Islington.

 

The 1871 census found the parents and first three children living at 2 Gloucester Villas, Shakespeare Road, Acton.  Father Bernard was a collector and traveller in the coal trade.  The family seems elusive in the 1881 census.

 

The 1891 census found parents and all six children except Eveline living in Upper Holloway (!), Islington.  Father Bernard was a collector of accounts.  Samuel and Bernard junior were clerks in an office.  Helen and Amelia were dressmakers.  Gertrude was a scholar.

 

Non-Chess Life of Edith Martha Crittenden

 

The parents of Edith Martha Crittenden were John Denton Crittenden (born 1833/34, Dartford, Kent, baptise 28/09/1834) and Laura Elizabeth Crittenden (née Charlier, 1833/37, Barmen, Prussia, becoming a naturalised British Subject) who married in 1860 and had the following four children, all born in the St Pancras area of London:

 

Dora Emily Crittenden

born 1862, Kentish Town

Alice Emma Crittenden

born 1864, Camden

Edith Martha Crittenden

born 1867/68, Camden

Frank Alexander Crittenden

born May/Jun 1870, Camden

 

The 1871 census found the parents, four children and a servant living at 31 Cantitones(?? - illegible) Road, Kentish Town. Father John was a sculptor.  Of the children, only Dora was a scholar.

 

John Denton Crittenden died on 22/04/1877, aged only 43, leaving 9-year-old Edith fatherless.

 

The 1881 census found widowed mother Laura, her four children, four boarders and a domestic servant living still at 31 Canttows(?? – still illegible) Road, Kentish Town.  Mother Laura had not stated means of supports, apart from implicit income from taking in boarders.  Nevertheless, Dora and Alice were art students, so following in their father’s footsteps, and Edith and Frank were scholars.

 

The 1891 census found mother Laura, three children Dora (erroneously recorded as Rosa), Edith and Frank, three German boards and a domestic servant, living at 20 Caversham Road, Kentish Town.  Mother Laura was now described as living on her own means.  Dora was a “governess of music”, which probably meant private music teacher.  23-year-old Edith had no stated occupation.  Frank was a lithographer, in the artistic footsteps of his father.

 

Non-Chess Life of Mr. and Mrs. Holloway

 

Samuel John Holloway and Edith Martha Crittenden married in 1891 and had three children:

 

Edith Gwendoline Holloway

born 1895, Upper Holloway

Nancy Winifred Holloway

born 1899, Upper Holloway

Samuel John Holloway, junior

born 1901, London

 

The 1901 census found parents Samuel and Edith living with daughters Edith and Nancy, and a servant, at Flynn Vale ( a house name, apparently) in the Queen Street, area of Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire.  Samuel was a Post Office clerk.

 

The family seems soon to have returned to London, where Samuel John Holloway, junior, was born later in 1901; he died in 1903, in London, at the age of only 2.

 

The 1911 census found parents Samuel and Edith, with their two daughters, visiting the Marley household at 8 Ceylon Place, Eastbourne, Sussex.  Samuel was now a head postmaster with the GPO, but where his job was located wasn’t stated.  Daughter Edith was a student, while daughter Nancy was at school.  (The student/school distinction isn’t too clear.)

 

In the immediate pre-war period, Samuel (and possibly Edith) seems t have been a member of Dartford Chess Club, suggesting they lived then in that area.

 

In 1921 Edith Gwendoline Holloway married Harold Christopher, who in time became executor to his mother-in-law.

 

Chess reports place he Holloways in Bromley in 1925.

 

Latterly, Samuel and Edith lived at 25 Howitt Road, Hampstead, London, where they resided at the time of their deaths.

 

Death

 

Samuel John Holloway of at 25 Howitt Road, Hampstead, London, died on 06/12/1946, at home, aged 79.

 

Edith Martha Holloway of at 25 Howitt Road, Hampstead, London, died on 08/05/1956, at Oxhey Grove Hospital, Oxhey Lane, Hatch End, Pinner, Middlesex, aged 88.

 

Oxhey Grove was a house purchased in 1941 by Harrow local authority and turned into a hospital for the chronically sick.  It opened with about a 30-bed capacity, increasing to 40 or so in the 1950s. [http://ezitis.myzen.co.uk/oxheygrove.html]

 

Chess

 

Whether the couple met through chess, or whether one picked it up from the other after they married is unclear, but it seems Edith was significantly the stronger player.  Samuel was more of an organiser, and wasn’t in evidence at the same levels as a player.

 

Evidence of Edith Martha Crittenden playing organised chess before her marriage is not immediately evident, but may exist in the local press etc.

 

Samuel was one of those involved in organising the 16th Kent County Chess Association Congress, held at Dartford in 1914.

 

In the post-war period they seemingly were members of Bromley then Bromley & Beckenham Chess Clubs, and were presumably the donors of the Holloway Cup, presented in the 1925/26 season to Bromley & Beckenham Chess.

 

Edith was variously recorded as Mrs. E. M. Holloway and Mrs. S. J. Holloway, with variations of those basic alternatives.  One imagines she did not take chess too seriously until after the children had grown up.  The following is a list of her more-memorable results:

 

Place

Venue

Year

Event

1

Hastings

1919

BCF Women's Championship

5

Bromley

1920

Kent Chess Association Annual Congress

5-6

Broadstairs

1921

Kent Chess Association Annual Congress?

7

Margate

1923

Kent Chess Association Annual Congress?

1-2

Meran

1924

pseudo European Women's Championship

5

Paris

1924

pseudo Olympiad

8

London

1924

5-6

Bromley

1925

Kent Chess Association Annual Congress?

4-5

London

1926

11

Hyères

1927

4-5

London

1927

1st Women's World Chess Championship

9

London

1927

9-10

London

1928

8-10

Tenby

1928

BCF Congress

8-9

London

1928

5

Scarborough

1929

5th Scarborough Whit Congress

6-7

Warsaw

1935

5th Women's World Chess Championship

1

Bournemouth

1936

BCF women's championship

10‑16

Stockholm

1937

6th Women's World Chess Championship

 

Edith was British Ladies’ Chess Champion of 1919 and 1936.

 

In the 1920s Edith was a leading player for Brompton (& Beckenham), and was presumably a member of the Brompton & Beckenham team which won the (Kent) County Cup in 1927, 1927 and 1930.  (Tunbridge Wells won it in 1928.)

 

Samuel was seemingly less prominent as a player.  He finished 2nd-3rd= in the Major (second) Section of the 1925 Scarborough Whit Congress.

 

He was appointed to the Committee of the BCF in 1919, as part of the post-war re-launch of the organisation.

 

Both Samuel and Edith were clearly held in high esteem by the Kent County Chess Association, as they both became listed among the few Honorary Vice-Presidents.  “Honorary” here meant they didn’t have to pay anything for the privilege; the hordes of ordinary vice-presidents had to pay 10/6 each for the year.  Thus the Holloway household saved a guinea per annum!  They were Honorary VP’s from 1938-39 or earlier through to 1946-47.  Edith may have still been one in 1947-48 (no info to hand), but the system seems to have altered by 1948-49 to having only one Vice-President.

 

 

Created

23/03/2015

Copyright © 2015 Stephen John Mann

Census information is copyright of The National Archive, see UK Census Information

Last Updated

23/03/2015