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Year Book 2018-19 Contents

Calendar of Events – Results/Reports

  

(Under construction.)

 

01/09/2019

 

English Women’s Chess Championships 2019

 

The 2019 English Women’s Chess Championships were held at the Royal Hull Hotel Elizabethan Suite, 170 Ferensway, Hull, HU1 3UF, over 5 rounds, from 30th August to 1st September.

 

Despite large place prizes (1st £1,200; 2nd £650; 3rd £350) entries totalled only 34 (and only 33 actually participated).  It seems the organisers in Hull were somewhat disappointed that there were not more entries, though 34 was in fact an all-time record high!

 

Two entrants were recognisable as being from Yorkshire.  The 2017 winner had chosen to play in the Darnall & Handsworth Rapidplay!

 

Louise Head and Katarzyna Toma finished 1st-2nd equal, each with on 4½ out of 5.

 

No

Name

1

2

3

4

5

SPS

1

Katarzyna Toma

1

B

20

1

W

11

1

B

15

½

W

2

1

B

6

 

 

WGM

 

1

 

 

2

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

14

2

Louise Head

1

B

22

1

W

19

1

B

6

½

B

1

1

W

5

 

 

WFM

 

1

 

 

2

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

14

3

Zoe Varney

1

B

14

1

W

16

0

B

7

1

W

10

1

B

9

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

2

 

 

2

 

 

3

 

 

4

 

12

4

Niamh Bridgeman

0

B

7

1

W

25

1

B

19

1

W

15

1

B

18

 

 

AFM

 

0

 

 

1

 

 

2

 

 

3

 

 

4

 

10

5

Rayelynn Posadas

1

B

18

½

W

10

1

B

27

1

W

7

0

B

2

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

6

Sarah N Longson

1

W

21

1

B

26

0

W

2

1

B

17

0

W

1

 

 

WFM

 

1

 

 

2

 

 

2

 

 

3

 

 

3

 

11

7

Kanwal K Bhatia

1

W

4

½

B

8

1

W

3

0

B

5

½

W

13

 

 

WFM

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

10.5

8

Fenella Headlong

1

B

30

½

W

7

½

B

10

½

W

18

½

B

12

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

3

 

10

9

Julie L Denning

1

B

23

0

W

15

1

B

14

1

W

16

0

W

3

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

2

 

 

3

 

 

3

 

10

10

Lavanya Maladkar

1

W

32

½

B

5

½

W

8

0

B

3

1

W

23

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

2

 

 

3

 

9.5

11

Yaoyao Zhu

1

W

13

0

B

1

½

W

17

1

B

27

½

W

15

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

9

12

Kamila Kolpashnikova

½

W

17

0

B

21

1

W

29

1

B

32

½

W

8

 

 

 

 

½

 

 

½

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

8

13

Tashika Arora

0

B

11

½

W

20

1

B

24

1

W

22

½

B

7

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

½

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

7.5

14

Georgia Headlong

0

W

3

1

B

33

0

W

9

1

B

30

1

W

28

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

2

 

 

3

 

7

15

Nadia Jaufarally

1

W

28

1

B

9

0

W

1

0

B

4

½

B

11

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

2

 

 

2

 

 

2

 

 

 

9.5

16

Anum Sheikh

1

W

33

0

B

3

1

W

28

0

B

9

½

W

21

 

 

WCM

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

2

 

 

2

 

 

 

8.5

17

Agnieszka Milewska

½

B

12

1

W

24

½

B

11

0

W

6

½

B

20

 

 

 

 

½

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

2

 

 

 

8.5

18

Katie C Ball

0

W

5

1

B

32

1

W

21

½

B

8

0

W

4

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

1

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

8

19

Alaa Gamal

1

W

31

0

B

2

0

W

4

½

B

28

1

W

27

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

7

20

Sai Chinmayee N Kumaar

0

W

1

½

B

13

1

W

31

½

B

23

½

W

17

 

 

(Bradford)

 

0

 

 

½

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

6.5

21

Sara Sengenberger

0

B

6

1

W

12

0

B

18

1

W

25

½

B

16

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

2

 

 

 

6.5

22

Ritika Maladkar

0

W

2

1

B

31

½

W

23

0

B

13

1

W

29

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.5

23

Zahra Jaufarally

0

W

9

1

-

bye

½

B

22

½

W

20

0

B

10

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

2

 

6.5

24

Tarini Jayawarna

½

-

bye

0

B

17

0

W

13

½

B

29

1

W

31

 

 

 

 

½

 

 

½

 

 

½

 

 

1

 

 

2

 

4.5

25

Roxolana Chaban

0

W

26

0

B

4

1

W

33

0

B

21

1

W

30

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

0

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

2

 

4

26

Joanne Hutchinson

1

B

25

0

W

6

½

-

bye

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.5

27

Thisumi Jayawarna

½

-

bye

1

B

29

0

W

5

0

W

11

0

B

19

 

 

 

 

½

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.5

28

Lana Boztas

0

B

15

1

W

30

0

B

16

½

W

19

0

B

14

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

5

29

Anika R Roy

½

-

bye

0

W

27

0

B

12

½

W

24

0

B

22

 

 

 

 

½

 

 

½

 

 

½

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

3.5

30

Monika Cakova

0

W

8

0

B

28

1

W

32

0

W

14

0

B

25

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

0

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

3

31

Felicity Ol Pettit

0

B

19

0

W

22

0

B

20

1

W

33

0

B

24

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

0

 

 

0

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

2

32

Nadege Brossier

0

B

10

0

W

18

0

B

30

0

W

12

1

-

bye

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

0

 

 

0

 

 

0

 

 

1

 

1

33

Kira Mackenzie

0

B

16

0

W

14

0

B

25

0

B

31

 

 

 

 

 

(Leeds University)

 

0

 

 

0

 

 

0

 

 

0

 

 

0

 

0

 

 

British < = > English?

 

The change from the “British” Chess Federation to the “English” Chess Federation started a move to “English” events running alongside pre-existing “British” ones.  Thus in 2017 we saw the “first ever” English Rapidplay Championships played in Liverpool, as well as the long-established British Rapidplay Championships being held in Ilkley.  You might ask what the ECF is messing about at, but of course they in fact run neither rapidplay event!

 

When it comes to standard-play championships, the British Women’s Championship has a long-established history.  Originally it was normally run as a separate event parallel to the “British” proper at the BCF-run British Championships congress.  Then in recent times it was subsumed into the main “British” championship, with the women’s title being awarded to the highest-placed eligible player, which may have suited the stronger female players, but may well have deterred the weaker ones.

 

Then in 2017 an “English” version of a women’s championship was held in Birmingham (seemingly with only 11 entries) with the winner qualifying for the English Women’s Olympiad team.  Then in 2018 it was held in Solihull (30 entries).  Then in 2019 it was held in Hull, with 33 participants.

 

So, why a separate “English” Women’s Championship?  Well it seems to provide something for women who do not qualify for the main British Championship competition, but the “top” female players do not participate in this “English” championship.  The fact that the ECF created the post of Director for Women’s Chess probably was the cause.

 

Is there a need for women-only events?  The primary justification for women-only events is presumably to promote chess among women.  Such events, in preference to heavily male-dominated weekend congresses, may be more attractive to some female players, but the number of female chess players seems currently too low to allow such ventures to be very successful.